Silence your 3D printer

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Silence your 3D printer

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Foreword

Let’s continue with the 3D printer upgrades series. Today I will show you guys how to lower the noise from your 3D printer. You can hardly hear anything except the fan after following all my steps below.

This guide is applied for both Kossel and Cartesian 3D printer so don’t worry.

Please refer these link below for more posts in the 3D printer upgrade series:
1. Enclose your Kossel (Delta) 3D printer.
2. Light up your 3D printer.

Now, let’s get started.

Vibration suppression foot (Must do)

Noise usually comes from the vibration of the whole 3D printer when it’s operating on a hard floor. This noise is easily reduced by some proper suppression foot.

For the Kossel 3D printer:

 

For the Cartesian 3D printer: 

  • You can buy the anti-vibration shock absorbing feet here, it’s kinda cheap.

Figure: Anti-vibration shock absorbing feet 

 

Vibration damper for all stepper motors (Must do)

Here is the picture of a vibration damper

Figure: Vibration damper for NEMA17 stepper motor

Most of the old NEMA stepper motors usually comes with the vibration damper. However, I have seen many people throwing it away and simply attach the steppers directly to the frame. Please avoid doing this because these little things can help you reduce the noise dramatically with an extremely minimal effort.

Here is the link where you can buy if not having one: https://www.amazon.com/Rubber-Stepper-Vibration-Damper-Screws/dp/B07413FLKZ

Please follow my guild below to know how to attach this to your stepper correctly:

Lubricate all fans (Must do)

The noise also comes from the fan, either the extruder or power supply fan. Just make sure you put some oil into the fans bearing before using them.

Please follow my guild below to know how to lubricate a fan correctly without damaging it:

Damper for carbon rods (Must do)

Please skip this step if you are using a Cartesian 3D printer.

There is a little vibration on each carbon rod while printing. By using some springs (or rubber bands) to connect each pair of rods, you can easily eliminate this. In addition,  doing this also help improve your print quality, especially while printing small parts.

Please check the picture below to know to install those springs:

Here is the difference between having and not having the damper for carbon rods:

As can be seen in the picture, the surface is now smoother than before thanks to those dampers.

 

Decrease the voltage on stepper driver (Must do)

Now we are going through the most crucial step. By doing this step appropriately, you can reduce the noise significantly.

Please follow my guide below to know how to find the “golden voltage” on your stepper driver. “Golden voltage”, in this case, is the voltage at which the stepper can operate silently without overheating or missing any steps.

Step 1: Get a Digital VOM, change the scale to 20VDC

Step 2: Measure voltage between the turnpot cap and GND.

Step 3: Using a ceramic screwdriver (to avoid short-circuit while measuring) and adjust until you get 0.42V DC on VOM.

Step 4: Power on the printer and try moving each axis separately. While it is moving, you can try holding the stepper as hard as you can to make sure it won’t miss any step. If it still does, you will need to increase the voltage and redo this step.

 

Enclose the 3D printer (Must do)

Enclose your 3D printer will basically isolate the printed space from the outer environment such as temperature or dust.

For Kossel 3D printer, I’ve already had a tutorial here:
Enclosing the Kossel / Delta 3D printer

For Cartersian 3D printer, because of the difference in mechanical structure, it makes the Cartesian 3D printer enclosure pretty easier than the Kossel. The only thing you need to do is building a box and simply put it in.

Change to use more silent fans (Optional)

This step is just a recommendation. If you already lubricate the fans and happy with the result, you don’t need to do this step.

Replace all the stepper driver with TMC2208 (Optional)

Here is the link to buy the TMC2208: TMC2208

This is just an optional step. In my opinion, by doing the “5. Decrease the voltage on stepper driver” is enough.

Note that to install and running your board with TMC2208, you will need to update the firmware to support it.

Congratulations!

I hope you can make yourself go through all those steps above. Now you can just let your printer silently do it job. My printer is going from around 65dB to 47dB and it’s a huge difference.

Don’t forget to subscribe to my newsletter for more interesting articles. 

Have fun!

WRITTEN BY

Trung Do

Firmware engineer, blogger and a makerholic 

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Make a wireless charging dock for iPhone and Apple watch

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MAKE A WIRELESS CHARGING DOCK FOR IPHONE AND APPLE WATCH

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Foreword

I need to have a station to charge my phone and watch at the same time. It needs to be neat as much as possible because I want to place it on my working desk. 

I realize that I can make use of the Nightstand mode on apple watch to turn it into a clock. As a result, I will have a charging station, where I can read all notifications without touching my phone, and a clock to see the time whenever I want. 

Now, let’s get started!

1. Design

Here are my 3D design for the charging station:

2. Materials and printed parts

Please find in the list below all the materials needed for this project:

Printed parts:

You can find all the printed parts here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2936442

  • 1x Part_1_Charge_Wire or 1x Part_1_Charge_Writeless (depends on your need).
  • 1x Part_2
  • 1x Part_3

You only need to print with 0.2mm/layer and 5% infill for the part_1. It will take approximately 3h30m to print it.

3. Print settings

You can print multiple parts at the same times without the need for support. Here are my print settings for your reference:
  • Material: PLA
  • Support: No
  • Resolution: 0.2mm/layer
  • Infill: 20%
  • Temperature: 190 (C)

4. Assemble

  • Print all parts and assemble as in the picture below.

5. Result

And here is what we got after all these steps:

With my design, you are able to hide all spare wires in the bottom of the station.

It took me around 4 hours to print all these parts and the result is absolutely satisfied.

Have fun!

WRITTEN BY

Trung Do

Firmware engineer, blogger and a makerholic 

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Make an SD/microSD card holder using 3D printer

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MAKE AN SD/MICRO-SD CARD HOLDER USING 3D PRINTER

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Foreword

SD and microSD cards are commonly using nowadays for many things from cameras to miniPCs but how to keep all of them in place is such a pain with most of us. Therefore, I came up with a design to solve this problem. Now, let’s get started!

1. Design

Here is my final design.

2. Materials and printed parts

 Please find in the list below all the materials needed for this project:

Materials:

  • 1x Transparent acrylic (WxLxH = 111×73.5x2mm)
  • 1x Black acrylic (WxLxH = 114.5×75.5x2mm)

Printed parts:

You can find all the printed parts here: https://www.thingiverse.com/thing:2911250

  • 1x Part_01
  • 2x Part_02
  • 1x Part_03
  • 1x Part_04
  • 1x Part_05
  • 1x Part_06

3. Print settings

You can print multiple parts at the same times without the need for support. Here are my print settings for your reference:
  • Material: PLA
  • Support: No
  • Resolution: 0.2mm/layer
  • Infill: 20%
  • Temperature: 190 (C)

4. Assemble

  • Print all parts and assemble as in the picture below.

5. Result

And here is what we got after all these steps:

Let’s take a look with this video below

With this design, your SD and micro SD cards will be kept safely. One of the cool features is you have the place to label each of them. 

This box can keep up to 6 SD cards and 5 micro SD cards and you can hold it in your hand. 

Have fun!

WRITTEN BY

Trung Do

Firmware engineer, blogger and a makerholic 

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Light up your 3D printer

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Light up your 3D printer

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Foreword

Let’s continue with the upgrades series for the Kossel 3D printer. Today I decided to light up my delta by using LED strips. Therefore, it will make my print job overnight be easier.

1. Design

Here is the draft design for this project. First of all, the frames, which are marked as blue on the picture, are 3D printed. The all LED strips are going to be attached on them. In addition, our frame will have a specify angle to make sure all light directions will point directly to the center of the heatbed.

2. Materials and printed parts

Please find in the list below all the materials needed for this project:

Materials:

  • 6x LED stripes (12VDC, width: 1cm, length: 15cm each)
  • M3x10mm bolts
  • M3 T-nuts Wires

Printed parts: 

You can find all the printed parts here: www.thingiverse.com/thing:2943798

  • 6x Part01
  • 6x Part02
  • 6x Part02_Mirror

Part 01

Part 02

Part 02

Assemble

3. Print settings

You can print multiple parts at the same times without the need for support. Here are my print settings for your reference:
  • Material: PLA
  • Support: No
  • Resolution: 0.2mm/layer
  • Infill: 20%
  • Temperature: 190 (C)

4. Assemble

  • Step 01: Using 12V LED strip (1cm in width) and cut it into 6 pieces (15cm each)

  • Step 02: Soldering all 6 LED strips.

  • Step 03: Wire out all LED strips.

  • Step 04: Make a small board to attach all LED strips, 12VDC power supply and ON/OFF switch.

  • Step 04 (cont.): Make a small board to attach all LED strips, 12VDC power supply and ON/OFF switch.

  • Step 05: Connect and test all LED strips
  • Step 06: Using a piece of tape to cover all circuit board

  • Step 07: Use M3 T-nut and bolts to attach the board to the frame (below the heated bed).

  • Step 08: Attach the board to the frame (below the heated bed).

  • Step 09: Print 6xPart01, 6xPart02 and 6xPart02_Mirror to make 6 LED strips holder.

  • Step 10: Using super glue to attach LED stripe into LED stripe holder (Part01). Remember to attach the Part02 and Part02_Mirror to Part02 before doing this step.

  • Step 11: Attach all LED strips to 3d printer frame with M3 T-Nuts.

  • Step 11 (cont.): Here is what we have after installing all of LED strips

  • Step 12: Remove the heated bed and connect all LED stripes to the small board we’ve made before. For the 12VDC input, you can use directly from 3d printer power supply.

  • Step 13: For the ON/OFF switch, you can place it in front.

5. Result

And here is what we got after all these steps:

Let’s take a look with this video below

If you want to cover your 3D printer like I do, please refer a tutorial here: How to enclose your Kossel 3D printer

Have fun!

WRITTEN BY

Trung Do

Firmware engineer, blogger and a makerholic 

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Enclosing the Kossel / Delta 3D printer

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ENCLOSE A KOSSEL / DELTA 3D PRINTER

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Foreword

I’ve just got the new 3D printer and decided to upgrade it.

Enclosing it is coming at the top of my list. After finding out that most of the available designs on the internet are showing how to enclose the Cartesian 3D printer, not the Delta so it’s time to do it myself. 

Now, let’s get started.

1. Design

There are 3 things I want to achieve in this project: light weight, good appearance and cheap. After doing some quick drafts, here is my final design.

We will have 3 doors and it can open. However, in normal use, the left and right doors will be fixed into the frame, only the front door can be opened. When we need to maintain, we just need to unscrew them.

In addition, I realize part of the extruder can sometimes pass to the outside of the printer while printing large object. Therefore, I give it some spaces between frame and door.

2. Materials and printed parts

2mm acrylic sheets will be used for the coverage because it’s transparent, cheap and pretty easy to cut to the desired size.

Please find in the list below all the materials needed for this project:

Materials:

  • 3x Acrylic sheet 2mm x 302mm x 600mm (big sheet)
  • 6x Acrylic sheet 2mm x 50mm x 600mm (small sheet)
  • 8x M3x30mm bolts
  • 50x M3x10mm bolts
  • M3 T-nuts
  • M3 nuts and washers

Printed parts: 

You can find all the printed parts here: www.thingiverse.com/thing:2943798

  • 3x Part_1
  • 3x Part_2
  • 5x Part_2_Mirror
  • 2x Part_3
  • 12x Part_4
  • 2x Part_5

3. Print settings

You can print multiple parts at the same times without the need for support. Here are my print settings for your reference:
  • Material: PLA
  • Support: No
  • Resolution: 0.2mm/layer
  • Infill: 20%
  • Temperature: 190 (C)

4. Assemble

  • Step 1: Assemble 3 back hinges using 3x Part_1, 3x Part_2 and 3x Part_2_Mirror

  • Step 2: Connect 1 big sheet with 2 small sheets using Part_4, M3x10mm bolts, and nuts. After that, we will have 3 doors after this step (1 left, 1 right, 1 front)

  • Step 3: Attach acrylic sheets to the hinges to create the left and right doors and move the power supply to the bottom

  • Step 4: Attach left and right doors to your Kossel.
  • Step 5: Because Left and right doors do not need to open always, let’s directly attach them to the front aluminum extrusion. The hinge at step 1 will help hold the doors in case you want to maintain your 3d printer later.

  • Step 6: Using 2x Part_2_Mirror and 2x Part_3 to create 2 front hinges.
  • Step 7: Attach the front door along with the front hinges to your 3D printer using M3x10mm bolts, washer, and T-nuts.

  • Step 8: Put 1 round magnet into Part_5 and attach to the aluminum extrusion. It will help lock the front door.

  • Step 9: Using super glue and attach a steel washer to the front door.

5. Result

And here is what we got after all these steps:

Let’s take a look with this video below

Let’s check it out other posts of mine to add light to Kossel 3D printer if you guys want to put some LEDs into your machine.

Have fun!

WRITTEN BY

Trung Do

Firmware engineer, blogger and a makerholic 

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